Bullying 101: Prevention And Coping Tips For Parents

Success in school depends on many factors, including how well a child interacts socially with classmates. With school back in session, attention turns to an issue that’s often in the spotlight – bullying. Regardless of whether your child has had personal experience with bullying, it’s important to talk about how to recognize bullying and to make sure your child understands how and why it’s harmful. One of the most important things you can do is help your child develop an empathetic awareness of others’ feelings and what it means to be a good friend. It’s also a good idea to talk regularly with your child about school, activities and friends.

If you think your child is being bullied, there are some common signs and symptoms that often accompany this, such as frequent stomachaches, headaches and a lack of desire to attend school. If you suspect something is wrong, trust your instincts and talk to your child. Reassure by letting your child know that you care and are there to listen and help, if necessary. Generally, it’s not a good idea to tell your child you won’t tell anyone about the bullying, especially if it becomes clear you need to contact the school or another parent.

Many parents feel helpless when their child is the victim of bullying. There are some things you can do, however, to address the situation. Practice role-playing with your child at home. Encourage your child to react firmly and confidently to harsh words. Stress that responding with insults or physical aggression will only make the problem worse. Suggest that your child participate in activities that will build self-esteem and allow him or her to meet new people.

If your child is reluctant or embarrassed to share information with you, and you still suspect there is a problem with bullying, consider contacting a school counselor for guidance and support. (If you think your child is in physical danger, contact the school immediately.) Your family doctor or your child’s pediatrician may also have good advice and can direct you to reputable resources or a specialist.

Debra Balos, DO

Author of this Article

Debra Balos, DO, specializes in family medicine. She is a guest columnist located at IU Health Physicians Primary Care – Zionsville, 6866 W. Stonegate Dr., Ste 100 in Zionsville. She can be reached by calling the office at 317.768.6000

View More Articles By This Author

Viewing all posts in …

Other Blog Posts That May Interest You

Blog

Family Emergency Plan: Back to School Edition

Family Care

Accidents and emergencies never call ahead to warn you. For families with children in school,...

Continue reading
Blog blog-the-importance-of-reading-to-your-child-09282015

The Importance of Reading to Your Child

Family Care

Most of us adults would recognize the impact literacy has on our daily lives. But did you realize...

Continue reading
Blog Blog Helping Your Child Cope With Bullies 04012016

Helping Your Child Cope With Bullies

Family Care

There are few things as disturbing as finding out your child is a victim of bullying. While hitting,...

Continue reading

Viewing all posts in …